Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BEGIN

She suggested the 4th of July to him as the time to begin operations.

Foreigners, especially Greeks, begin to dominate the country.

The bell had rung—the curtain was up and the performances were about to begin.

And let there be no misunderstanding—we are going to begin to act, beginning today.

But he has played so many of these jokes that they begin to lose their effect.

Now hurry into your dressing gown and let's begin our letters.

All I can do is to go away where no one knows me, and begin over again.

Try as she might she could think of no effectual way to begin.

Or perhaps it would be safer to begin with raspberries and cream.

After all she was about to begin the work she herself had chosen.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English beginnan "to begin, attempt, undertake," a rare word beside the more usual form onginnan (class III strong verb; past tense ongann, past participle ongunnen); from bi- (see be-) + West Germanbic *ginnan, of obscure meaning and found only in compounds, perhaps "to open, open up" (cf. Old High German in-ginnan "to cut open, open up," also "begin, undertake"), with sense evolution from "open" to "begin." Cognates elsewhere in Germanic include Old Frisian biginna "to begin," Middle Dutch beghinnen, Old High German beginnan, German beginnen, Old Frisian bijenna "to begin," Gothic duginnan.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BEGIN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.