Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FLY

I fly to seek a kindlier sphere, Since thou hast ceased to love me here.

Should not one fly the man who is but suspected of such a one?

I have thirteen arrows yet, and if one of them fly unfleshed, then, by the twang of string!

Chip carefully brushed a fly off Polly's flank with the whip.

Now fly; for the other Gorgons will do their utmost to take vengeance for Medusa's death.

It is a wonder that the sparks did not fly, the Devil struck so hard on the hot iron.

She fortunately caught them, but then the handkerchiefs began to fly.

It made Tom fly, but it took the stiffening all out of my legs.

They are to us like the sun and moon and stars, to which we cannot fly.

"They haven't the strength to protect a fly," John whispered to his neighbour.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English fleoge "fly, winged insect," from Proto-Germanic *fleugjon (cf. Old Saxon fleiga, Old Norse fluga, Middle Dutch vlieghe, Dutch vlieg, Old High German flioga, German Fliege "fly); literally "the flying (insect)" (cf. Old English fleogende "flying"), from same source as fly (v.1).

Originally any winged insect (hence butterfly, etc.); long used by farmers and gardeners for any insect parasite. The Old English plural in -n (cf. oxen) gradually normalized 13c.-15c. to -s. Fly on the wall "unseen observer" first recorded 1881. An Old English word for "curtain" was fleonet "fly-net." Fly-swatter first attested 1917. Fly-fishing is from 1650s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FLY

airlift

verbtransport
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.