Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PILOT

Who is going to say whether an applicant is competent to pilot a balloon or airship?

Captain Bob has been a Sandy Hook pilot for some years back.

That afternoon it cleared off, and we found a pilot lying a little outside of us.

At the Long Sault, we were all put in boats, with a Canadian pilot in each end.

Not a pilot would come out, and if they had, it would have done us no good.

We put our pilot on board this ship, which was doing a good turn all round.

The pilot immediately said, “Why, where could he have been brought up?”

The keel was laid for a ship of thirty-five tons, to be named the Pilot.

He was like a pilot who finds the tempest too strong for him.

The pilot of the incoming plane was there, too, and the radio man.

WORD ORIGIN

1510s, "one who steers a ship," from Middle French pillote (16c.), from Italian piloto, supposed to be an alteration of Old Italian pedoto, which usually is said to be from Medieval Greek *pedotes "rudder, helmsman," from Greek pedon "steering oar," related to pous (genitive podos) "foot" (see foot (n.)). Change of -d- to -l- in Latin ("Sabine -l-") parallels that in odor/olfactory; see lachrymose.

Sense extended 1848 to "one who controls a balloon," and 1907 to "one who flies an airplane." As an adjective, 1788 as "pertaining to a pilot;" from 1928 as "serving as a prototype." Thus the noun pilot meaning "pilot episode" (etc.), attested from 1962. Pilot light is from 1890.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PILOT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.