conductor

[ kuh n-duhk-ter ]SEE DEFINITION OF conductor

Synonyms for conductor

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Antonyms for conductor

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONDUCTOR

The conductor was standing on the pavement when John descended.

I engaged a retired army colonel for a conductor on board my yacht.

I, who had engaged as Conductor of the Set and found myself their Arbiter as well.

"Citizen Defarge," said he to Darnay's conductor, as he took a slip of paper to write on.

The one was to be, as it were, the conductor, and the other the statesman of the expeditionary corps.

The Russian surlily told the conductor to attend to the wants of the lady.

The conductor muttered a reply, and that reply the Russian translated.

The conductor and crew of the local freight were lounging comfortably in the caboose.

When the conductor came the farmer presented his ticket, and the lawyer a pass.

I'm not the only one that worries on my run—ask the conductor.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s, "one who leads or guides," from Middle French conductour (14c., Old French conduitor), from Latin conductor "one who hires, contractor," in Late Latin "a carrier," from conductus, past participle of conducere (see conduce).

Earlier in same sense was conduitour (early 15c., from Old French conduitor). Meaning "leader of an orchestra or chorus" is from 1784; meaning "one who has charge of passengers and collects fares on a railroad" is 1832, American English. Physics sense of "object or device that passes heat" is from 1745; of electricity from 1737.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONDUCTOR

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.