synonyms
  • definitions

cap

[ kap ]SEE DEFINITION OF cap
  • nounsmall hat
  • verboutdo a performance

Synonyms for cap

  • beret
  • DINK
  • beanie
  • bonnet
  • fez
  • pillbox
  • skullcap
  • tam
  • tam o'shanter
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CAP

"I'll walk a bit with you," said his sister, donning her jacket and a cap.

"I'll come," said he, disappearing in search of cap and gloves.

I am afraid just now I am thinking more of the cap than of what it means.

When, at last, he rose and picked up his cap; it was nine o'clock.

To save her cap she had taken it off, and early streaks of silver showed in her hair.

"If I'd known you were coming I would have borrowed a cap," she said.

He had his Sunday clothes on, which was good; and his cap was also on his head.

Pushing his plate to one side, Stineli's father put his cap on his head.

You're getting dreadfully mannish in your appearance, daughter; it's that cap.

He is like a camera with the cap on—he never gets a new impression.

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English cæppe "hood, head-covering, cape," from Late Latin cappa "a cape, hooded cloak" (source of Spanish capa, Old North French cape, French chape), possibly a shortened from capitulare "headdress," from Latin caput "head" (see head (n.)).

Meaning "women's head covering" is early 13c. in English; extended to men late 14c. Figurative thinking cap is from 1839 (considering cap is 1650s). Of cap-like coverings on the ends of anything (e.g. hub-cap) from mid-15c. Meaning "contraceptive device" is first recorded 1916. That of "cap-shaped piece of copper lined with gunpowder and used to ignite a firearm" is c.1826; extended to paper version used in toy pistols, 1872 (cap-pistol is from 1879).

The Late Latin word apparently originally meant "a woman's head-covering," but the sense was transferred to "hood of a cloak," then to "cloak" itself, though the various senses co-existed. Old English took in two forms of the Late Latin word, one meaning "head-covering," the other "ecclesiastical dress" (see cape (n.1)). In most Romance languages, a diminutive of Late Latin cappa has become the usual word for "head-covering" (e.g. French chapeau).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CAP

abuse

verbattack with words
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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