Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ANGEL

“If an angel be a messenger of God, I trow he is one,” said Tibble.

That I am not now; nor have I been from the moment I beheld this angel of a woman.

So there is full proof, that she came not from above all at once an angel!

And an angel still rides in the whirlwind and directs this storm.

If a call come to a man in prison it will be by an angel who can let him out.

It seemed to my sleepy eyes as if an angel had melted his own door through the wall!

Truly a demon had possessed him: might not an angel have been by him as he slept?

Diablo's no angel, as you've said, Langdon, and this boy made him a heap worse.

So the years passed, the angel watching his blooming charge.

The same dream had I,—an angel appearing to me and speaking these very words.

WORD ORIGIN

14c. fusion of Old English engel (with hard -g-) and Old French angele, both from Latin angelus, from Greek angelos "messenger, envoy, one that announces," possibly related to angaros "mounted courier," both from an unknown Oriental word (Watkins compares Sanskrit ajira- "swift;" Klein suggests Semitic sources). Used in Scriptural translations for Hebrew mal'akh (yehowah) "messenger (of Jehovah)," from base l-'-k "to send." An Old English word for it was aerendgast, literally "errand-spirit."

Of persons, "loving; lovely," by 1590s. The medieval gold coin (a new issue of the noble, first struck 1465 by Edward VI) was so called for the image of archangel Michael slaying the dragon, which was stamped on it. It was the coin given to patients who had been "touched" for the King's Evil. Angel food cake is from 1881; angel dust "phencyclidine" is from 1968.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ANGEL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.