Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FIEND

The fiend prevailed; and Prudence vanished into the outer darkness.

Under the tutelage of the mad god, White Fang became a fiend.

Twas seen and told how an avenger survived the fiend, as was learned afar.

“I think von Francius would be a fiend if he could,” said Karl, comfortably.

But they are of aspiring nature, and this fact was known to the Fiend.

His two aids, the Saint and the Fiend, had a bad time of it.

Now there was a fiend grovelling at her feet, a foul, sin-stained fiend.

Some said that his mother was a goddess, his father a fiend out of hell.

"The fiend's in the man," Morty replied, tapping with his fingers on the table.

He was a fiend, the Inglez: look how many of us he has killed!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English feond "enemy, foe," originally present participle of feogan "to hate," from Proto-Germanic *fijæjan (cf. Old Frisian fiand "enemy," Old Saxon fiond, Middle Dutch viant, Dutch vijand "enemy," Old Norse fjandi, Old High German fiant, Gothic fijands), from PIE root *pe(i)- "to blame, revile" (cf. Gothic faian "to blame;" see passion).

As spelling suggests, it was originally the opposite of friend, but the word began to be used in Old English for "Satan" (as the "enemy of mankind"), which shifted its sense to "diabolical person" (early 13c.). The old sense of the word devolved to foe, then to the imported word enemy. For spelling with -ie- see field. Meaning "devotee (of whatever is indicated)," e.g. dope fiend, is from 1865.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FIEND

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.