Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DEVIL

And you forget that—that devil—suppose she's as good as her threat?

And, the devil of it, that love increasing with her—what shall I call it?

I can look any man in the face and tell him to go to the devil.

It's a pity it wasn't the devil himself instead of his fish!

The mitigation of that horror they condemn, resent, and often ascribe to the devil.

How the devil would have laughed at the idea of a society for saving the world!

The devil saw his chance, sprang up, and mastered the father.

"To the devil with your tricks," said John, opening and shutting his great red hands.

"I would see him in the claws of the devil first," whispered Ford.

Something in her eyes roused the devil of mischief that always slumbered in him.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English deofol "evil spirit, a devil, the devil, false god, diabolical person," from Late Latin diabolus (also the source of Italian diavolo, French diable, Spanish diablo; German Teufel is Old High German tiufal, from Latin via Gothic diabaulus).

The Late Latin word is from Ecclesiastical Greek diabolos, in Jewish and Christian use, "Devil, Satan" (scriptural loan-translation of Hebrew satan), in general use "accuser, slanderer," from diaballein "to slander, attack," literally "throw across," from dia- "across, through" + ballein "to throw" (see ballistics). Jerome re-introduced Satan in Latin bibles, and English translators have used both in different measures.

In Vulgate, as in Greek, diabolus and dæmon (see demon) were distinct, but they have merged in English and other Germanic languages.

Playful use for "clever rogue" is from c.1600. Meaning "sand spout, dust storm" is from 1835. In U.S. place names, the word often represents a native word such as Algonquian manito, more properly "spirit, god." Phrase a devil way (late 13c.) was originally an emphatic form of away, but taken by late 14c. as an expression of irritation.

Devil's books "playing cards" is from 1729, but the cited quote says they've been called that "time out of mind" (the four of clubs is the devil's bedposts); devil's coach-horse is from 1840, the large rove-beetle, which is defiant when disturbed. "Talk of the Devil, and he's presently at your elbow" [1660s].

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DEVIL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.