synonyms
  • definitions

spirit

[ spir-it ]SEE DEFINITION OF spirit
  • nounsoul, attitude
  • nounatmosphere, essence
  • nounghost

Synonyms for spirit

MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for spirit

  • apathy
  • cowardice
  • fear
  • idleness
  • inactivity
  • lethargy
  • weakness
  • discouragement
  • dullness
  • indifference
  • powerlessness
  • timidity
  • being
  • reality
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SPIRIT

Wonderful are the accounts he brings of that far-off world, where his spirit wanders.

Aspasia said wisely, that the spirit of beauty flows in, only where the proportions are harmonious.

The spirit and the gifts of freedom ill assort with the condition of a slave.

"That contains the spirit of all prayer," said the old philosopher.

The spirit of the strong man was moved, and he trembled like a leaf shaken by the wind.

I hope I'll have the old Bines philosophy and the young Bines spirit.

His spirit yearned after his father, and his heart was sick for his forest home.

But he was a generous man and all meanness of spirit was foreign to his soul.

When did you feel the fetters fust busting from your spirit?

It is a spirit contracted in its views, selfish in its objects.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c., "animating or vital principle in man and animals," from Old French espirit, from Latin spiritus "soul, courage, vigor, breath," related to spirare "to breathe," from PIE *(s)peis- "to blow" (cf. Old Church Slavonic pisto "to play on the flute").

Original usage in English mainly from passages in Vulgate, where the Latin word translates Greek pneuma and Hebrew ruah. Distinction between "soul" and "spirit" (as "seat of emotions") became current in Christian terminology (e.g. Greek psykhe vs. pneuma, Latin anima vs. spiritus) but "is without significance for earlier periods" [Buck]. Latin spiritus, usually in classical Latin "breath," replaces animus in the sense "spirit" in the imperial period and appears in Christian writings as the usual equivalent of Greek pneuma.

Meaning "supernatural being" is attested from c.1300 (see ghost); that of "essential principle of something" (in a non-theological sense, e.g. Spirit of St. Louis) is attested from 1690, common after 1800. Plural form spirits "volatile substance" is an alchemical idea, first attested 1610; sense narrowed to "strong alcoholic liquor" by 1670s. This also is the sense in spirit level (1768).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SPIRIT

Holy Ghost

nounspirit of god
  • Dove
  • Holy Spirit
  • comforter
  • intercessor
  • paraclete
  • presence of God
  • spirit
  • spirit of Truth

ambiance

nounair
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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