Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PSYCHE

Of course this isn't all mine; it includes ma's and Psyche's.

The Bineses, with the exception of Psyche, were at breakfast a week later.

"And you know we shall be in mourning," said Psyche to her brother.

"And of course we must go to the Episcopal church there," said Psyche.

Psyche wondered what new misfortune could be in store for her.

Not for myself, but for a sculptor I know who's on the look-out for a Psyche.

This Psyche is emerging from her garments and she holds in her hand a lamp.

So had Psyche been, and the fatal lamp should have told her so.

In Cupid and Psyche, it had been Psyche who had wanted to know, to see.

And, as Psyche was, they were always sorry for it afterwards.

WORD ORIGIN

1640s, "animating spirit," from Latin psyche, from Greek psykhe "the soul, mind, spirit; breath; life, one's life, the invisible animating principle or entity which occupies and directs the physical body; understanding" (personified as Psykhe, the beloved of Eros), akin to psykhein "to blow, cool," from PIE root *bhes- "to blow, to breathe" (cf. Sanskrit bhas-), "Probably imitative" [Watkins].

Also in ancient Greek, "departed soul, spirit, ghost," and often represented symbolically as a butterfly or moth. The word had extensive sense development in Platonic philosophy and Jewish-influenced theological writing of St. Paul (cf. spirit (n.)). Meaning "human soul" is from 1650s. In English, psychological sense "mind," is attested by 1910.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PSYCHE

anima

nounspirit
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.