poltergeist

[ pohl-ter-gahyst ]SEE DEFINITION OF poltergeist
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR POLTERGEIST

I was told you claimed you had to have a poltergeist in the process.

Yet where did these articles go, and of what use would they be to a poltergeist?

In case you rejected our applicant for the poltergeist job you have in mind, I was to hand you this.

On this theory they sent her to her home in a neighboring village, where the poltergeist continued to annoy her.

Poltergeist phenomena, however, seldom coincide with the ordinary phenomena of a haunt.

Perhaps, if he took no notice, the poltergeist would be discouraged and subside.

If trickery is not detected the poltergeist is the manifestation of an evil spirit.

The poltergeist phenomenon is usually spectacular and is nearly always associated with teen-age neurotics.

A poltergeist that up to the present had confined its attentions to me, no one else in the house having either heard or seen it.

Well, sir, I don't know if you have ever heard of the Henker's Poltergeist, but it is a fact well known to all in the township.

WORD ORIGIN

1838, from German Poltergeist, literally "noisy ghost," from poltern "make noise, rattle" (from PIE root *bhel- (4) "to sound, ring, roar;" cf. bellow, bell) + Geist "ghost" (see ghost). In the native idiom of Northern England, such phenomenon likely would be credited to a boggart.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR POLTERGEIST

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.