Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HUMOR

He did not believe Hines; yet he had to humor him, in a measure.

It is not humor that is irreverent, but the mind that gives it the wrong turn.

They recognized the humor hidden in the answer, and enjoyed it.

Rosenfeld eyed him suspiciously, but, possessing a sense of humor also, he grinned.

But either Epimetheus had not heard the tap, or was too much out of humor to notice it.

That was hardly possible, for Jane had a keen sense of humor.

The zany was progenitor to the specialist in humor, as we to-day have the unhappiness to know him.

It seemed, however, as if the humor of the animal had suddenly changed.

Here is a specimen of his graceful blending of irony and humor.

They called it humor, but it sounded like something quite different.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "fluid or juice of an animal or plant," from Old North French humour (Old French humor; Modern French humeur), from Latin umor "body fluid" (also humor, by false association with humus "earth"); related to umere "be wet, moist," and to uvescere "become wet," from PIE *wegw- "wet."

In ancient and medieval physiology, "any of the four body fluids" (blood, phlegm, choler, and melancholy or black bile) whose relative proportions were thought to determine state of mind. This led to a sense of "mood, temporary state of mind" (first recorded 1520s); the sense of "amusing quality, funniness" is first recorded 1680s, probably via sense of "whim, caprice" (1560s), which also produced the verb sense of "indulge," first attested 1580s. "The pronunciation of the initial h is only of recent date, and is sometimes omitted ...." [OED] For types of humor, see the useful table below, from H.W. Fowler ["Modern English Usage," 1926].

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HUMOR

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.