Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CATERED

No, sir, we have catered too long for the public not to know what its size is.

But then, the uni-sexual Sirians, of course, often catered to their own feminine taste.

The young gentry for whom he catered were not the “apples of his eyes” they had been.

Have they not acted in public, laboured for the public, catered for the public?

Besides, she is a nuisance on the yacht if she must be catered to all the time.'

You said what you chose, and spoke from your own convictions, and catered to no one.

Thereafter my trade was catered for by the best of manufacturers.

It was a privilege to be catered to by this master of his art.

But the Elizabethan Dramatist was a man who catered to the Elizabethan play-goer.

They have catered more for the intellect than for the heart and conscience.

WORD ORIGIN

"provide food for," c.1600, from Middle English catour (n.) "buyer of provisions" (c.1400; late 13c. as a surname), a shortening of Anglo-French achatour "buyer" (Old North French acatour, Old French achatour, 13c., Modern French acheteur), from Old French achater "to buy," originally "to buy provisions," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *accaptare, from Latin ad- "to" + captare "to take, hold," frequentative of capere "to take" (see capable).

Or else from Vulgar Latin *accapitare "to add to one's capital," with second element from verbal stem of Latin caput (genitive capitis); see capital (adj.). Figuratively from 1650s. Related: Catered; catering.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.