Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BABY

When he "played" with Baby Akemit thereafter, the pretence was not all with the child.

Dear baby, it promised its mother it wouldn't drink wine for two months.

If she was incompetent I wasn't bound to keep her just because she'd had a baby.

If Maggie had made bad arrangements for her baby, Maggie was responsible.

I came to see, ma'am, whether you'd take me back, as I 'aven't got Baby now.

It had something to do with Mona, with Maggie and Maggie's baby.

What if the sight of Tillie's baby did not do all that he expected?

She was fighting death for herself and her baby—but for how long?

Her sister, Norah, the youngest of the family, had told of her first baby.

For answer, he crossed over to her quickly, reached down and took the baby from her.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., babi, diminutive of baban (see babe + -y (3)). Meaning "childish adult person" is from c.1600. Meaning "youngest of a group" is from 1897. As a term of endearment for one's lover it is attested perhaps as early as 1839, certainly by 1901; its popularity perhaps boosted by baby vamp "a popular girl," student slang from c.1922. As an adjective, by 1750.

Baby food is from 1833. Baby blues for "blue eyes" recorded by 1892 (the phrase also was used for "postpartum depression" 1950s-60s). To empty the baby out with the bath (water) is first recorded 1909 in G.B. Shaw (cf. German das Kind mit dem Bade ausschütten). Baby's breath (noted for sweet smell, which also was supposed to attract cats) as a type of flower is from 1897. French bébé (19c.) is from English.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BABY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.