Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BIG

She's one of the build that aren't so big as they look, nor yet so small as they look.

Can't tell; you don't know how big pills she's been smokin'.

I saw 'em fur years, with a big cuttin' out to show the cross-section.

And there was big, handsome, Eddie Arledge, whose father had treated him shabbily.

I've often thought I'd go into some of these big operations here.

Now don't breathe a word of this, but there's a big deal on in Consolidated Copper.

He is as big and brawny as Ascapart at the bar-gate at Southampton.

“Thou art a big fellow for a school,” said his uncle, looking him over.

They considered civilisation a failure because it was killing off all the big game.

I shall marry you, if you think I'm the woman to help you in that big, new life of yours.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, northern England dialect, "powerful, strong," of obscure origin, possibly from a Scandinavian source (cf. Norwegian dialectal bugge "great man"). Old English used micel in many of the same senses. Meaning "of great size" is late 14c.; that of "grown up" is attested from 1550s. Sense of "important" is from 1570s. Meaning "generous" is U.S. colloquial by 1913.

Big band as a musical style is from 1926. Slang big head "conceit" is first recorded 1850. Big business "large commercial firms collectively" is 1905; big house "penitentiary" is U.S. underworld slang first attested 1915 (in London, "a workhouse," 1851). In financial journalism, big ticket items so called from 1956. Big lie is from Hitler's grosse Lüge.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BIG

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.