Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HUMAN

It had the pure and placid expression of the human soul, when it dwells in love and peace.

But then, I always was a terrible poor judge of human nature.

Even the village was too human, too modern, for his early-pagan mood.

We do not know how or why or when the human race began its career upon this Earth.

It will not be sufficient that the rash counsels of human passion are rejected.

We sense the call of the human heart for fellowship, fraternity, and cooperation.

And then she saw, on the sofa at one side of the place, a human form under a sheet.

Freedom is one of the deepest and noblest aspirations of the human spirit.

Every victory for human freedom will be a victory for world peace.

Human freedom is on the march, and nowhere more so than our own hemisphere.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-15c., humain, humaigne, from Old French humain, umain (adj.) "of or belonging to man" (12c.), from Latin humanus "of man, human," also "humane, philanthropic, kind, gentle, polite; learned, refined, civilized," probably related to homo (genitive hominis) "man" (see homunculus) and to humus "earth," on notion of "earthly beings," as opposed to the gods (cf. Hebrew adam "man," from adamah "ground"). Cognate with Old Lithuanian zmuo (accusative zmuni) "man, male person."

As a noun, from 1530s. Its Old English cognate guma (from Proto-Germanic *guman-) survives only in disguise in bridegroom. Related: Humanness. Human rights attested by 1680s; human being by 1690s. Human relations is from 1916; human resources attested by 1907, American English, apparently originally among social Christians and drawn from natural resources.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR HUMAN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.