Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORTAL

They were fabled as seven sisters, and one lost her place in the sky by marrying a mortal.

Yet he knew that he was not fatally injured if he could stop that mortal drain of his wounds.

If it be drinkable by any manner of mortal, I must moisten my throat with it.

There's no good to mortal creature i' the bones or blood of her!

Alas, the vanity of mortal projects, even when they centre in the grave!

It would have been more than mortal not to take offense at that.

Antaeus could not endure to have it said that any mortal was half so mighty as himself.

Neither did the mortal envelope of the late Mr Verloc reposing on the sofa.

A man is at once material and immaterial, mortal and immortal.

It was soon perceived, upon examination, that the wound was mortal.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "deadly," also "doomed to die," from Old French mortel "destined to die; deserving of death," from Latin mortalis "subject to death, mortal, of a mortal, human," from mors (genitive mortis) "death," from PIE base *mer- "to die," with derivatives referring to death and human beings" (cf. Sanskrit mrtih "death," martah "mortal man;" Avestan miryeite "dies," Old Persian martiya- "man;" Armenian meranim "die;" Latin mori "to die;" Lithuanian mirtis "mortal man;" Greek brotos "mortal" (hence ambrotos "immortal"); Old Church Slavonic mrutvu "dead;" Old Irish marb, Welsh marw "died;" Old English morþ "murder"). The most widespread Indo-European root for "to die," forming the common word for it except in Greek and Germanic. Watkins says it is "possibly" the same as PIE *mer- "rub, pound, wear away" (see morbid).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MORTAL

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.