Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LIVES

But unless he did something a hundred lives perhaps might be lost.

To the end of the lives of the spectators, it was a tale of wonder.

Just think of the Hippopotamus, the horse or "hippos" that lives in the rivers.

Strange, by what slender threads our lives are knitted to each other!

Lanning, if I had you at my back I could laugh at the law the rest of our lives!

Americans are called to enact this promise in our lives and in our laws.

In our own lives, let each of us ask—not just what will government do for me, but what can I do for myself?

For all of us are on that same journey of our lives, and our journey, too, will come to an end.

A painter friend who lives by the sea has asked me to stay with him awhile.

It is because the Caucasian believes in Him that he lives in fear and dies in fear.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English lifian (Anglian), libban (West Saxon) "to be, to live, have life; to experience," also "to supply oneself with food, to pass life (in some condition)," from Proto-Germanic *liben (cf. Old Norse lifa "to live, remain," Old Frisian libba, German leben, Gothic liban "to live"), from PIE root *leip- "to remain, continue" (cf. Greek liparein "to persist, persevere;" see leave). Meaning "to make a residence, dwell" is from c.1200. Related: Lived; living.

To live it up "live gaily and extravagantly" is from 1903. To live up to "act in accordance with" is 1690s, from earlier live up "live on a high (moral or mental) level" (1680s). To live (something) down "outwear (some slander or embarrassment)" is from 1842. To live with "cohabit as husband and wife" is attested from 1749; sense of "to put up with" is attested from 1937. Expression live and learn is attested from c.1620.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.