epoch

[ ep-uhk or, esp. British, ee-pok ]SEE DEFINITION OF epoch

Synonyms for epoch

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EPOCH

The mail, at this epoch, was very different from what it is at present.

No epoch of time can claim a copyright in these immortal fables.

But in this country and at this epoch this is exactly what it has not got.

But at that epoch I did not admire anything belonging to the Germans.

With this, the second epoch of the history of Freeland may be regarded as closed.

In a word, at this epoch Christianity was not only a religion but a Church.

Since that epoch, all the titularies of this position have borne the title of Go-Chi.

At this epoch, Buddhism had taken deep root in this country.

Will they forego the facts of an epoch, for the orthography of a syllable?

Most surely she had dreamed of nights like this at an epoch which she could not recall.

WORD ORIGIN

1610s, epocha, "point marking the start of a new period in time" (e.g. the founding of Rome, the birth of Christ, the Hegira), from Late Latin epocha, from Greek epokhe "stoppage, fixed point of time," from epekhein "to pause, take up a position," from epi "on" (see epi-) + ekhein "to hold" (see scheme (n.)). Transferred sense of "a period of time" is 1620s; geological usage (not a precise measurement) is from 1802.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR EPOCH

age

nouna period of time
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.