Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BIDE

"The danger may bide," said he, shrugging his broad shoulders.

Here I am, and here I bide, while God gives me strength to lift a sword.

In sooth, it is bad for those who fall, but worse for those who bide behind.

Here I must bide, and talk and sew and spin, and spin and sew and talk.

If we bide here, who knows that some fresh tumult may not break out.

"Old John will bide at home, sire," said the rugged soldier.

It is time that we were at the wars, for our good swords will not bide in their scabbards.

"Bide ye, mem, till ye hear what it is," rejoined the minister.

"Ay, bide, Jamie; and I winna come near ye," sobbed his mother.

I'll get Kirsty to big ane, and mebbe she 'll come and bide in 't wi' me whiles!'

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bidan "to stay, continue, live, remain," also "to trust, rely" (cognate with Old Norse biða, Old Saxon bidan, Old Frisian bidia, Middle Dutch biden, Old High German bitan, Gothic beidan "to wait"), apparently from PIE *bheidh-, an extended stem of one root of Old English biddan (see bid (v.)), the original sense of which was "to command," and "to trust" (cf. Greek peithein "to persuade," pistis "faith;" Latin fidere "to trust," foedus "compact, treaty," Old Church Slavonic beda "need"). Perhaps the sense evolved in prehistoric times through "endure," and "endure a wait," to "to wait." Preserved in Scotland and northern England, replaced elsewhere by abide in all senses except to bide one's time. Related: Bided; biding.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BIDE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.