Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ENDURES

He is always like the Speaker in the House,—the person who does the least, and endures the most.

The intervals between these visits he endures under protest.

I perceived at once that the faith which endures beyond its own knowledge was placed in all I said.

Like the Master who, for the joy that was set before Him, endures the cross.

Without remorse, he endures all its horrors; without guilt, he endures all its shame.

Love forgives all things, believes all things, hopes for all things, endures all things.

The intensity of suffering it endures from these sources is beyond description.

Martyrdom is the more glorious the greater the indignities it endures.

Because he loves us he endures to hear our cry and see our tears.

So Paul heads the list with patience; which does not produce sedition, but endures it.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "to undergo or suffer" (especially without breaking); late 14c. "to continue in existence," from Old French endurer (12c.) "make hard, harden; bear, tolerate; keep up, maintain," from Latin indurare "make hard," in Late Latin "harden (the heart) against," from in- (see in- (2)) + durare "to harden," from durus "hard," from PIE *deru- "be firm, solid."

Replaced the important Old English verb dreogan (past tense dreag, past participle drogen), which survives in dialectal dree. Related: Endured; endures.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.