telluric

[ te-loo r-ik ]SEE DEFINITION OF telluric
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TELLURIC

Was the phenomenon of telluric origin—Etna or an earthquake?

Well, we are here in the stronghold of these telluric forces.

I have heard it ascribed to “telluric influence,” but that is a wide and vague expression.

Although it has but a feeble attraction for bases, telluric acid forms salts which are called tellurates.

This telluric anhydride (TeO3) is entirely insoluble in water, nitric and hydrochloric acids, and alkaline solutions.

Ethiopian "telluric" architecture uses the pile in the construction of beds, huts for guards, dwelling houses, and meeting places.

Under the incessant slow variations of these astronomical, telluric, and geographical influences life has no rest.

The telluric lines, meanwhile, remained unaffected, so as to be "virtually mapped" by the process.

If the telluric acid be placed upon platinum wire in the reduction flame, the oxidation flame is colored green.

The oxide of tellurium and telluric acid gives a clear bead when it is hot, but white after it is cooled.

WORD ORIGIN

"pertaining to Earth as a planet," 1836, from Latin tellurem "the earth" (see tellurian) + -ic.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TELLURIC

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.