namby-pamby

[ nam-bee-pam-bee ]SEE DEFINITION OF namby-pamby
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NAMBY-PAMBY

Any workman in the school of Namby-Pamby could have kept their purity.

She was very beautiful in her soft, foolish, namby-pamby, blue-eyed way.

He witnessed a performance—not too namby-pamby—of Punch and Judy.

Ruth Fielding was not namby-pamby, although she was far from quarrelsome.

She was not at all weak or namby-pamby, but she was a universal peace-maker.

She ain't no namby-pamby, Susie-Sozzles sort of a gal—no, ma'am!

Why did you make us walk in front, namby-pamby so, Papa dear?

The idea of a broken heart had always seemed to Winn namby-pamby.

I took it for granted Horace would admire some namby-pamby with a doll's face.

Namby-pamby in these days is not thrown away if it be introduced in the proper quarters.

WORD ORIGIN

"weakly sentimental, insipidly pretty," 1745, from satiric nickname of English poet Ambrose Philips (1674-1749) mocking his sentimental pastorals addressed to infant members of the nobility. Used first in 1726 in a farce credited to Carey. Related: Namby-pambical.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NAMBY-PAMBY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.