Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WALLOWING

We are, on the contrary, fumbling and wallowing about where the Greek pondered and philosophized.

He stamped them into the snow under him in the wallowing struggle.

A sea hog is a wallowing boat with a long, black, heavy snout.

The brute was wallowing on the surface now, the water boiling around him.

You can fancy how dirty we became, splashing, stumbling, wallowing in it.

And now the rock had melted away and left him wallowing in a deep pool.

The flower of the Roman patriciate was wallowing in this monstrous treachery.

It was a period of wallowing for everything on four feet or on two.

Their elders were hidden from the wallowing hippopotami by the crest of the knoll.

I stared at it, and began to gulp tragically, wallowing in a wave of self-pity.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English wealwian "to roll," from West Germanic *walwojan, from PIE *wel- "to roll" (see volvox). Figurative sense of "to plunge and remain in some state or condition" is attested from early 13c. Related: Wallowed; wallowing. The noun is recorded from 1590s.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.