Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PATRON

But the patron is a friend of mine; he will do his very best for you after what I have written.'

Napoleon was neither boy nor man, patron, king, nor pope; he was Napoleon!

I began to thank my patron saint that the Snake River was crossed.

"It's but what might have been looked for," he said, lightly, in answer to some sad words of my patron's.

Each of his men had, as usual, a patron saint according to his name or taste.

Directly he arrived, he would claim the protection of his patron Bragadino.

I want another two thou', friend of my youth and patron of my later years.

Patron of gold mine investors and American tourists in Europe.

He was the patron saint of Cortez, as he was also of the Thames watermen.

The Virgin of Atocha is the patron of the sovereigns of Spain.

WORD ORIGIN

"a lord-master, a protector," c.1300, from Old French patron "patron, protector, patron saint" (12c.) and directly from Medieval Latin patronus "patron saint, bestower of a benefice, lord, master, model, pattern," from Latin patronus "defender, protector, former master (of a freed slave); advocate," from pater (genitive patris) "father" (see father (n.)). Meaning "one who advances the cause" (of an artist, institution, etc.), usually by the person's wealth and power, is attested from late 14c.; "commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery" [Johnson]. Commercial sense of "regular customer" first recorded c.1600. Patron saint (1717) originally was simply patron (late 14c.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PATRON

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.