Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GEM

My young travelling companion is enthusiastic about this gem of Germany.

Since such gift the gem gleamed bright on the breast of the queen.

This production is a gem, and always attracts the wonder and amazement of foreigners.

Holding toward the lamp a glass, clear as crystal, with luster like a gem.

By the way, your editorial explanation of Astounding Stories was a gem.

It is a gem of its kind, and will bear reprint in full today.

As for the chapel itself, he described it as a gem that even Venice could not rival.

If any of my readers have ever seen a gem of a place, they will know exactly what that means.

Our own ignorance of this gem makes us blush (unseen, we hope).

A fine Latin letter was a gem, which a man envied his neighbour.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English gimm "precious stone, gem, jewel," also "eye," from Latin gemma "precious stone, jewel," originally "bud," perhaps from the root *gen- "to produce," or from PIE *gembh- "tooth, nail." Of persons, from late 13c. Forms in -i-, -y- were lost early 14c., and the modern form of the word probably representing a Middle English borrowing from Old French gemme (12c.). As a verb, from c.1600, "to adorn with gems;" mid-12c. as "to bud."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GEM

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.