diamond

[ dahy-muh nd, dahy-uh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF diamond
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DIAMOND

Ostensibly they were a literary society; really they were diamond polishers.

So a king's ransom is what Benlli paid for his wife's diamond ring.

Mr. Hartgold took up a diamond with a pair of pincers, and exhibited it to the banker.

Mr. Carter said this at a venture, for he did not know which of the men had the diamond belt.

The young lady there with the diamond collar and the wonderful eyes?

By and by they would have a table for themselves, and in their turn celebrate the diamond wedding.

Their son's words did not surprise them; they had heard them coming ever since their diamond wedding.

The hues of the opal, the light of the diamond, are not to be seen if the eye is too near.

When a Kaffir strikes a diamond, he gets a commission, and so does his overseer.

Take her from foretop to fetlocks, she's as lovely as a diamond flush.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from Old French diamant, from Medieval Latin diamantem (nominative diamas), from Vulgar Latin *adiamantem (altered by influence of the many Greek words in dia-), from Latin adamantem (nominative adamans) "the hardest metal," later, "diamond" (see adamant). Playing card suit is from 1590s; Sense in baseball is American English, 1875.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DIAMOND

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.