Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LAID

They laid Paralus upon a couch, with the belief that he slept to wake no more.

You are, indeed, fortunate in having escaped from the snare he laid for you.

She lowered her voice as her eyes dilated, and she laid her hand on his arm.

Then the whip was brought into requisition, and it was laid on with no light hand.

Why else the disgraceful confinement I have been laid under?

Katherine, in deep distress, laid her hand on the girl's arm.

Thank goodness and Mrs. Gray, there are no carpets to be laid.

All I ask, said Stokes, is to be laid by that officer that I may die in his presence.

I should not lay so much emphasis on this if so much emphasis were not laid on it in the other direction.

He folded the letter, laid it down by the side of his plate, and began to eat again.

WORD ORIGIN

past tense and past participle of lay (v.). Laid-up "injured, sick," originally was a nautical term (1769) describing a ship moored in harbor. Laid off "temporarily unemployed" is from 1916. Get laid "have sex" (with someone) attested from 1952, U.S. slang. Laid-back "relaxed" is first attested 1973, perhaps in reference to the posture of highway motorcyclists. Laid up "incapacitated" originally was of ships.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.