sabbatical

[ suh-bat-i-kuh l ]SEE DEFINITION OF sabbatical
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SABBATICAL

Every statesman like every professor should have his sabbatical year.

Has this principle any reference to the sabbatical ordinance?

The Jubilee allowed the same privileges as the sabbatical year.

He must have meant, not "years," but weeks of years—Sabbatical years.

What more hardy than his dealing with the sabbatical year, with idolatry?

We were now alone in the silent house, and there was a Sabbatical stillness all around.

A sabbatical calm results from the contemplation of his labours.

The country is so full of prejudice that I am driven to Sabbatical quiescence.

All this week, thanks in a great measure to the prolonged Bank Holiday, Witanbury had been bathed in a sabbatical calm.

The travelers were unable, indeed, to awaken into any feeling of Sabbatical straitness.

WORD ORIGIN

1640s, "of or suitable for the Sabbath," from Latin sabbaticus, from Greek sabbatikos "of the Sabbath" (see Sabbath). Noun meaning "a year's absence granted to researchers" (originally one year in seven, to university professors) is from 1934, short for sabbatical year, etc., first recorded 1886 (the thing itself is attested from 1880, at Harvard), related to sabbatical year (1590s) in Mosaic law, the seventh year, in which land was to remain untilled and debtors and slaves released.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SABBATICAL

leave

nounholiday, time off

leave of absence

nountime away from regular job or school
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.