Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STARTS

Admitted into our consciousness it starts its work of killing us.

It is too much seen by fits and starts, and sallies, and those not spontaneous.

Why then I will marry her; and bless my starts for such an angel of a wife.

You can leave London by the afternoon train, which starts at four o'clock.

He starts for the kitchen door inadvertently when he should be headed for the drawing-room.

His sleep was checkered with starts and moans, and sometimes with a muttered word or two.

Well, I guess when he starts the bully is greased lightning.

Merritt and I will stand by to catch him if he starts to faint.

Godwin starts by rejecting the traditional conception of punishment.

And let me know what kind of a fire this is that starts on a fifty-mile front!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English *steortian, *stiertan, Kentish variants of styrtan "to leap up" (related to starian "to stare"), from Proto-Germanic *sturtjan- (cf. Old Frisian stirta "to fall, tumble," Middle Dutch sterten, Dutch storten "to rush, fall," Old High German sturzen, German stürzen "to hurl, throw, plunge"), of unknown origin.

From "move or spring suddenly," sense evolved by late 14c. to "awaken suddenly, flinch or recoil in alarm," and 1660s to "cause to begin acting or operating." Meaning "begin to move, leave, depart" is from 1821. The connection is probably from sporting senses ("to force an animal from its lair," late 14c.).

Related: Started; starting. To start something "cause trouble" is 1917, American English colloquial. Starting block first recorded 1937.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.