Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SPARK

Dry and worm-eaten, a spark upon them became a smoulder, and a smoulder a blaze.

When he heard the drums he flared up like a spark in the tinder.

Every spark of human feeling had evidently been stifled in him.

The dark eyes of Antoun lit with a spark of surprise and laughter.

This was his work, the spark he had kindled was being fanned into a steady blaze.

A spark of magnanimity might awake in his soul—and then all would have been settled for the best.

But adulation, flunkeyism, concert, covered the spark with dirt and mud.

There was no spark visible of the fire which had flashed earlier in the day.

There is a spark of intelligence in his eyes, and an alien affectation in his speech.

Just a spark, otherwise we shall go into a melancholy decline.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English spearca, from Proto-Germanic *spark- (cf. Middle Low German sparke, Middle Dutch spranke, not found in other Germanic languages). Electrical sense dates from 1748. Slang sense of "a gallant, a beau, a lover" (c.1600) is perhaps a figurative use, but also perhaps from cognate Old Norse sparkr "lively." Spark plug first recorded 1903 (sparking plug is from 1902); figurative sense of "one who initiates or is a driving force in some activity" is from 1941.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SPARK

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.