Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SEEDS

Everywhere we see the seeds of the same growth that America itself has known.

Somewhere in him were the seeds of self-sacrifice, the seeds of a generous devotion to others.

Seeds from the south of France do not produce robust plants.

And yet the seeds of it must be in your heart, or it could not all at once shew itself so rampant.

Seeds blew in and shrubs and trees took the place of columns.

Peel your tomatas, cut them in half and squeeze out the seeds.

The seeds of knowledge had been sown, but they lacked moisture and had failed to grow.

With these were also granted 6,000 oxen accustomed to the plough, as well as supplies of seeds, &c.

This experience was harrowing, but it prepared his mind for the seeds of wisdom.

The seeds of water-melons are placed like those of the French melons.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sed, sæd "that which may be sown; an individual grain of seed; offspring, posterity," from Proto-Germanic *sediz "seed" (cf. Old Norse sað, Old Saxon sad, Old Frisian sed, Middle Dutch saet, Old High German sat, German Saat), from PIE *se-ti- "sowing," from root *se- (1) "to sow" (see sow (v.)). Figurative use in Old English. Meaning "offspring, progeny" rare now except in biblical use. Meaning "semen" is from c.1300. For sporting sense, see seed (v.).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.