concrete

[ kon-kreet, kong-, kon-kreet, kong- for 1–10, 13–15; kon-kreet, kong- for 11, 12 ]SEE DEFINITION OF concrete
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CONCRETE

For instance, take a concrete case; so best can we illustrate.

In other words, and to be concrete, put these things in the car while I fold the blanket.

Their front is one unbroken wall of sheet iron and concrete.

This third line of trenches was protected with armor plate and concrete.

And the bridges are not of iron and concrete, but of rainbows and––moonshine!

In his view, God and the church are a sort of concrete centred in the confessor.

Speculative or theoretic knowledge is divided into abstract and concrete.

Thus, physiology is an abstract science; but zoology is concrete.

Lemon juice and the juice of sorrel will also remove ink stains, but not so easily as the concrete acid of lemons, or citric acid.

The concrete is tamped, struck off to shape and smoothed with the belt at one operation.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "actual, solid," from Latin concretus "condensed, hardened, thick, hard, stiff, curdled, congealed, clotted," figuratively "thick; dim," literally "grown together;" past participle of concrescere "to grow together," from com- "together" (see com-) + crescere "to grow" (see crescent). A logicians' term until meaning began to expand 1600s. Noun sense of "building material made from cement, etc." is first recorded 1834.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CONCRETE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.