Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SOFT

She was quite still, and he noted from the change in her soft breathing that she slept.

These he drove firmly into the soft bottom of a shallow lake.

"He's layin' down," said Bill Dozier, and his voice was soft but audible in the saloon.

Andrew Lanning was town bred and soft of skin from the work at the forge.

She was saying in a thick, soft voice, "It was wrong of you, my darling."

But my husban' he's that soft hearted, miss, where anything i' the baby-line's a goin' on!

The banks of the river were steep, and consisted of soft clay.

So keen the blade, so soft the touch, the sleeper did not wake!

Cook the potatoes and onions in the water until they are soft.

The carpet was soft and rich; it gave back no sound of footfall.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English softe, earlier sefte, "gentle, mild-natured; easeful, comfortable, calm, undisturbed; luxurious," from West Germanic *samfti, from Proto-Germanic *samftijaz "level, even, smooth, gentle, soft" (cf. Old Saxon safti, Old High German semfti, German sanft; and from a variant form with -ch- for -f-, Middle Dutch sachte, Dutch zacht, German sacht), from root *som- "fitting, agreeable."

From c.1200 of material things, "not stiff, not coarse, fine; yielding to weight." From late 14c. of wind, rain, etc. Of sounds, "quiet, not loud," from early 13c. Of words, "mild, restrained; courteous" mid-14c. From late 14c. as "indulgent," also "physically feeble; easily overcome, lacking manly courage." From 1755 of water ("relatively free from mineral salts"), from 1789 of coal. Meaning "foolish, simple, silly" is attested from 1620s; earlier "easily moved or swayed; soft-hearted, sympathetic; docile" (early 13c.). In reference to drinks, "non-alcoholic" from 1880. As an adverb, Old English softe "gently;" late 13c. as "quietly." As an interjection from 1540s.

Soft landing is from 1958 and the U.S. space program. Adjective soft-core (in reference to pornography) is from 1966 (cf. hardcore). Soft rock as a music style is attested from 1969. Soft sell is from 1955. Soft-shoe as a dancing style is attested from 1927. Soft-boiled is from 1757 of eggs; of persons, ideas, etc., 1930 (cf. half-baked). Soft-focus (adj.) of camera shots is from 1917. The softer sex "women collectively" is from 1640s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SOFT

comfier

adjectivecomfortable

comfy

adjectivecomfortable
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.