Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SWEETEST

If you get it for him I'll thank you in the sweetest way possible.

Ah, I wish I could think so; it is the sweetest countenance!

To their furry little ears, it was the sweetest music that could be.

The song-birds of Earth gathered about her and sang their sweetest songs.

Fly, my sweetest, move those dainty feet of thine, for egad!

Why, my dear, there is the sweetest parcel of silks come over you ever saw!

Here then is the divine source of the sweetest and purest joy.

When I come back I'll be the sweetest little Willie in the diggin's.

I have come to know you for the sweetest, gentlest saint in all this world.

It was 'my love,' 'dearest,' 'sweetest,' ringing in our ears every moment.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English swete "pleasing to the senses, mind or feelings," from Proto-Germanic *swotijaz (cf. Old Saxon swoti, Swedish söt, Danish sød, Middle Dutch soete, Dutch zoet, Old High German swuozi, German süß), from PIE root *swad- "sweet, pleasant" (Sanskrit svadus "sweet;" Greek hedys "sweet, pleasant, agreeable," hedone "pleasure;" Latin suavis "sweet," suadere "to advise," properly "to make something pleasant to").

To be sweet on someone is first recorded 1690s. Sweet-talk (v.) dates from 1935; earliest uses seem to refer to conversation between black and white in segregated U.S. Sweet sixteen first recorded 1767. Sweet dreams as a parting to one going to sleep is attested from 1898, short for sweet dreams to you, etc. Sweet and sour in cooking is from 1723 and not originally of oriental food.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.