Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SIMPLE

After all, it was not a simple thing to put Bill Dozier off the trail.

His program was as simple as the curriculum of a Persian youth.

Until the furies got hold of him he was a simple soul, content with simple things.

I see myself a singer of simple songs, a laureate of the under-dog.

Two against three would be a simple thing, as long as he was one of the two.

The method of working with it was simple in idea, however difficult in practice.

Many a one imitates simplicity, but Amy was simple—one-fold.

Simple Alleyne opened his eyes at this little spurt of feminine bitterness.

Her words were simple enough, but they touched to the heart of the man accused by them.

The declaration, simple as it was, aroused the official to new indignation.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, "free from duplicity, upright, guileless; blameless, innocently harmless," also "ignorant, uneducated; unsophisticated; simple-minded, foolish," from Old French simple (12c.) "plain, decent; friendly, sweet; naive, foolish, stupid," hence "wretched, miserable," from Latin simplus, variant of simplex "simple, uncompounded," literally "onefold" (see simplex). Sense of "free from pride, humble, meek" is mid-13c. As "consisting of only one substance or ingredient" (opposite of composite or compounded) it dates from late 14c.; as "easily done" (opposite of complicated) it dates from late 15c.

From mid-14c. as "unqualified; mere; sheer;" also "clear, straightforward; easily understood." From late 14c. as "single, individual; whole." From late 14c. of clothing, etc., "modest, plain, unadorned," and of food, "plain, not sumptuous." In medicine, of fractures, etc., "lacking complications," late 14c. As a law term, "lacking additional legal stipulations, unlimited," from mid-14c.

In Middle English with wider senses than recently, e.g. "inadequate, insufficient; weak, feeble; mere; few; sad, downcast; mournful; of little value; low in price; impoverished, destitute;" of hair, "straight, not curly." As noun, "an innocent or a guileless person; a humble or modest person" (late 14c.), also "an uncompounded substance." From c.1500 as "ignorant people."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SIMPLE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.