Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HUMBLEST

A man likes to have the approval of even the humblest of his fellow-creatures.

They would take off their hats, and make the humblest bows you ever saw.

The humblest may see a way of improvement in their betters, and obey the command, "Follow me."

Occasionally, the brave and gentle character may be found under the humblest garb.

Only he had set her on high, where even the humblest woman longs to be set by some one.

Meg, at sixteen, had received so little from life that her expectations were of the humblest.

Besides, your bravest sentiment is familiar to the humblest men.

"Your humblest servant, madame," said he, his hand upon his heart.

The humblest piece in which Tony played was a drama full of interest.

He honored Gettysburg in thus honoring one of its humblest citizens.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-13c., from Old French humble, earlier humele, from Latin humilis "lowly, humble," literally "on the ground," from humus "earth." Senses of "not self-asserting" and "of low birth or rank" were both in Middle English Related: Humbly; humbleness.

To eat humble pie (1830) is from umble pie (1640s), pie made from umbles "edible inner parts of an animal" (especially deer), considered a low-class food. The similar sense of similar-sounding words (the "h" of humble was not pronounced then) converged in the pun. Umbles, meanwhile, is Middle English numbles "offal" (with loss of n- through assimilation into preceding article).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.