Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CLEANEST

Yet there is truth in what he says, for, as you know well, the song was not of the cleanest.

It was the freshest and cleanest world he had ever seen and she was one with it.

He can play any position on the diamond, and is one of the cleanest men in the business.

Geneva is one of the finest, cleanest, and most charming towns in the world.

The town is well built, and the cleanest I have yet seen since leaving Europe.

His coat is soiled and torn, his cravat is put on awry, and his linen is none of the cleanest.

This was the cleanest and most wholesome place I ever worked in.

He is the truest, cleanest, most right-seeking man I have ever seen.

She came up, smoothing down her apron with her hands, which were not of the cleanest.

It's the biggest, cleanest, quietest place I could even dream of!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English clæne "free from dirt or filth; pure, chaste, innocent; open, in the open," of beasts, "ritually safe to eat," from West Germanic *klainoz "clear, pure" (cf. Old Saxon kleni "dainty, delicate," Old Frisian klene "small," Old High German kleini "delicate, fine, small," German klein "small;" English preserves the original Germanic sense), from PIE root *gel- "bright, gleaming" (cf. Greek glene "eyeball," Old Irish gel "bright").

"Largely replaced by clear, pure in the higher senses" [Weekley], but as a verb (mid-15c.) it has largely usurped what once belonged to cleanse. Meaning "whole, entire" is from c.1300 (clean sweep in the figurative sense is from 1821). Sense of "innocent" is from c.1300; that of "not lewd" is from 1867; that of "not carrying anything forbidden" is from 1938; that of "free of drug addiction" is from 1950s. To come clean "confess" is from 1919, American English.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.