imbecile

[ im-buh-sil, -suh l or, esp. British, -seel ]SEE DEFINITION OF imbecile
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR IMBECILE

I do not know whose heads are criminal, but I think I know whose are imbecile.

The imbecile baron then got out; his shoulder was out of joint.

A man, aged 22, the son of an inebriate, with one imbecile sister.

He spent a whole evening measuring this imbecile's facial angle.

He flew into a passion, disowned his discovery, and called himself an imbecile.

To say that Columbus felt sure that he saw a light is to pronounce him an imbecile.

He did not answer, but the other imbecile, Josiah, answered for him.

In the year 1805, it is said, every legitimate monarch in Europe was imbecile.

She is there still, little better than an imbecile, I regret to say, and with no hope of recovery.

The President was represented as an imbecile, utterly devoid of statesmanship.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, imbecille "weak, feeble" (especially in reference to the body), from Middle French imbecile (15c.), from Latin imbecillus "weak, feeble" (see imbecility). Sense shifted to mental weakness from mid-18c. As a noun, "feeble-minded person," it is attested from 1802. Traditionally an adult with a mental age of roughly 6 to 9 (above an idiot but beneath a moron).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR IMBECILE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.