lenient

[ lee-nee-uh nt, leen-yuh nt ]SEE DEFINITION OF lenient
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LENIENT

The inferior clergy were by no means so lenient as the Bishop.

She laid a lenient tax upon the neighbors and the town below.

Now be lenient with me and don't get in a passion so easily, but be gentle like me.

Would you think it strange, your excellency, if they were not lenient?

Therefore he asked that the magistrate would consider all this, and be lenient.

He had been a funny horse-thief, so in return they were lenient.

I wish to be as lenient as possible, and, as I observed, the penalty will be merely nominal.

"But, father, you will be lenient towards them," cried the young man.

The laws were lenient, for most crimes could be atoned for by money or other fines.

He could well afford to be lenient to a rebel of his calibre.

WORD ORIGIN

1650s, "relaxing, soothing," from Middle French lenient, from Latin lenientem (nominative leniens), present participle of lenire "to soften, alleviate, mitigate, allay, calm," from lenis "mild, gentle, calm," probably from PIE root *le- "to leave, yield, let go, slacken" (cf. Lithuanian lenas "quiet, tranquil, tame, slow," Old Church Slavonic lena "lazy," Latin lassus "faint, weary," Old English læt "sluggish, slow," lætan "to leave behind"). Sense of "mild, merciful" (of persons) first recorded 1787. In earlier use was lenitive, attested from early 15c. of medicines, 1610s of persons.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LENIENT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.