Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LETTING

She was hardly thinking—only letting thoughts and feelings come and go.

They are not any the less mine because I am letting other people have a chance to enjoy them.

But this time, instead of letting her draw away, he put out his arms and caught her to him.

We are letting this world progress and roll right on past us without a struggle.

It was the liberation of his inner life, the letting out of his soul into the wide world.

Are you letting your pretty head run on the handsome gentleman.

And I could no longer scold Rachel for "letting things slide."

"I dunno where Saunders is again," he said, letting his consent be taken for granted.

He had expressed it, he thought, to the uttermost, by letting her go at all.

I'm not such a fool as to think—Ah, forgive me for letting her think that.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English lætan "to allow to remain; let go, leave, depart from; leave undone; to allow; bequeath," also "to rent" (class VII strong verb; past tense let, past participle læten), from Proto-Germanic *letan (cf. Old Saxon latan, Old Frisian leta, Dutch laten, German lassen, Gothic letan "to leave, let"), from PIE *le- "to let go, slacken" (cf. Latin lassus "faint, weary," Lithuanian leisti "to let, to let loose;" see lenient). If that derivation is correct, the primary sense would be "let go through weariness, neglect."

Of blood, from late Old English. To let (something) slip originally (1520s) was a reference to hounds on a leash; figurative use from 1540s. To let (someone) off "allow to go unpunished" is from 1814. To let on "reveal, divulge" is from 1725; to let up "cease, stop" is from 1787. Let alone "not to mention" is from 1812.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LETTING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.