Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INDULGENCE

All your scruples, you see, have met with an indulgence truly maternal from me.

There is no question that the indulgence in beer is merely an acquired habit.

For all indulgence in wine and coffee and tobacco you will have a bill to pay.

He was always kind to me, and if he failed in justice, it was on the side of indulgence.

She thanks you for your indulgence, on which she will not encroach.

Grief is the agony of an instant; the indulgence of Grief the blunder of a life.

It is not every indulgence of the feelings which is to be condemned.

For equity and indulgence are infractions of the perfect and strict rule of justice.

He was there, but he did not look as if his indulgence in the lamb-like sleep had been excessive.

He laughed with an affectation of indulgence, masking something else.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "freeing from temporal punishment for sin," from Old French indulgence or directly from Latin indulgentia "complaisance, fondness, remission," from indulgentem (nominative indulgens) "indulgent, kind, tender, fond," present participle of indulgere "be kind, yield," of unknown origin; perhaps from in- "in" + derivative of PIE root *dlegh- "to engage oneself."

Sense of "gratification of another's desire or humor" is attested from late 14c. That of "yielding to one's inclinations" (technically self-indulgence) is from 1640s. In British history, Indulgence also refers to grants of certain liberties to Nonconformists under Charles II and James II, as special favors rather than legal rights; specifically the Declarations of Indulgence of 1672, 1687, and 1688 in England and 1669, 1672, and 1687 in Scotland.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INDULGENCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.