excesses

[ noun ik-ses, ek-ses; adjective, verb ek-ses, ik-ses ]SEE DEFINITION OF excesses
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR EXCESSES

Passion, and passion only, can plead a just excuse of its own excesses.

He grew peevish, suspicious, and more violent than ever in his excesses.

He died at thirty-four, after a life of great triumphs and excesses.

There was an occasion when it might have been supposed there would have been excesses.

The source of his misery was yonder, in those markets, heated by the day's excesses.

I know not into what excesses my enthusiasm may have carried me.

Now, there 's no saying to what excesses he might be carried by this absurd passion.

Why should he be troubled with the Ellwell excesses in the fourth generation?

The prisoners were aided in their excesses by the enthusiasm of the fair sex.

He was old and ill, broken down from excesses and dissipations.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Old French exces (14c.) "excess, extravagance, outrage," from Latin excessus "departure, a going beyond the bounds of reason or beyond the subject," from stem of excedere "to depart, go beyond" (see exceed). As an adjective from late 15c.