diffuse

[ verb dih-fyooz; adjective dih-fyoos ]SEE DEFINITION OF diffuse
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DIFFUSE

Flora, who had seemed enchanting in all she said and thought, was diffuse and silly.

Knowledge is not necessarily light; and it is light, not knowledge, that we have to diffuse.

They diffuse what is known and forget what remains to be known.

The message was explicit, and, in the point of affection, diffuse.

A soft glow seemed to diffuse from the man's clothing and body.

One of the complaints often made against Euclid is that he is ‘diffuse’.

This is the religion, to diffuse which, strenuous efforts are now making in this country.

And the diffuse fury in him coalesced and burst into novalike flame.

Thus the awareness, as diffuse as it still was, of time got reinforced.

About this time there was also a disposition to diffuse education.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s (transitive), 1650s (intransitive), from Latin diffusus, past participle of diffundere "to pour out or away" (see diffusion). Related: Diffused; diffusing.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DIFFUSE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.