ecumenical

[ ek-yoo-men-i-kuh l or, esp. British, ee-kyoo- ]SEE DEFINITION OF ecumenical
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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ECUMENICAL

The English forms “oecumenical” and “ecumenical” are both used.

The constitutio de fide has been adopted by the Ecumenical Council, nemine contradicente.

Its claim to be ecumenical rests on its unanimous acceptance of "all the nations and all the churches of the Christian world."

Why not call an ecumenical council, appoint a commission to see to such things, and then forget the sacrilege?

It was the meeting-place of numerous ecclesiastical councils, some of them ecumenical (see below, Constantinople, Councils of).

Yet, despite its sectional character, the council came in time to be regarded as ecumenical alike in the West and in the East.

There was also a guarantee of full liberty for future conclaves and ecumenical councils.

Pio Nono was to summon an Ecumenical Council which was to be the greatest event of the century.

I wonder what th' Interurban Ixpriss Company w'u'd loike me t' be writin' thim on th' subject av 'ecumenical'?

Then commenced a deliberation, which finished up with insults and a confusion worthy of an ecumenical council of holy fathers.

WORD ORIGIN

late 16c., "representing the entire (Christian) world," formed in English as an ecclesiastical word, from Late Latin oecumenicus "general, universal," from Greek oikoumenikos, from he oikoumene ge "the inhabited world (as known to the ancient Greeks); the Greeks and their neighbors considered as developed human society," from oikoumenos, present passive participle of oikein "inhabit," from oikos "house, habitation" (see villa).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ECUMENICAL

catholic

adjectiveall-embracing, general
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.