Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SEED

Now it is a seed upon the wind, taking root in many nations.

"It was when the seed corn was gathered that we had the first hint of trouble," she went on.

For no matter how hungry the people may become the seed corn must not be eaten.

Margaret likes Kitty and Mrs. Bartlett,—so does everybody,—but old Bartlett's a seed.

An' I seed her touch his coat-tail, like as if she loved it, but didn't dast do no more.

I know where you can get some seed wheat if you want to try puttin' it in this fall.

I didn't git none o' the swag; it warn't my job, but I seed 'em through.

I seed she wanted ter git home to her husban', an' she tol' 'em so.

There's a gentleman to have run to seed in the Marshalsea jail!

As He spake to our fathers, to Abraham, and to his seed for ever!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sed, sæd "that which may be sown; an individual grain of seed; offspring, posterity," from Proto-Germanic *sediz "seed" (cf. Old Norse sað, Old Saxon sad, Old Frisian sed, Middle Dutch saet, Old High German sat, German Saat), from PIE *se-ti- "sowing," from root *se- (1) "to sow" (see sow (v.)). Figurative use in Old English. Meaning "offspring, progeny" rare now except in biblical use. Meaning "semen" is from c.1300. For sporting sense, see seed (v.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SEED

bean

nounsmall hard pellet
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.