Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR COIN

Last of all, there was the explosion, the carrying off of the coin in its canvas sacks to the horses.

They had best take care he did not pay them in their own coin.

"I had to coin a name for the place of meeting," he said to Mrs. Roberts afterwards.

He raised the covering hand, and peered at the coin in the gathering gloom.

What's any of them little haythen been coin' to scare ye, missy?

He put a coin into John's hand and then closed the lad's fingers over it.

A certain quality of the human hand in its relation to the coin of the realm.

Yes, General; but for Heaven's sake don't reprimand me: I disobeyed the coin.

That was the spirit in which I tossed up a coin to see which letter to read first.

Never knew what a good time he could have with his Dad's coin in Paris.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "a wedge," from Old French coing (12c.) "a wedge; stamp; piece of money; corner, angle," from Latin cuneus "a wedge." The die for stamping metal was wedge-shaped, and the English word came to mean "thing stamped, a piece of money" by late 14c. (a sense that already had developed in French). Cf. quoin, which split off from this word 16c. Modern French coin is "corner, angle, nook." Coins were first struck in western Asia Minor in 7c. B.C.E.; Greek tradition and Herodotus credit the Lydians with being first to make and use coins of silver and gold.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR COIN

chips

nounsubstitute for money; money
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.