impersonate

[ verb im-pur-suh-neyt; adjective im-pur-suh-nit, -neyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF impersonate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR IMPERSONATE

They intrude here, to impersonate the Nine Worthies before the two Courts.

Now when I am sixty-three I shall begin to impersonate children.

What would he have given to impersonate her lover in the piece!

She proceeded to impersonate both that heroine and Madame La Farge.

He used the choruses as Handel did, to impersonate the mass of people.

The students had chosen a hideous old grumbler to impersonate him.

Without it, anyone might impersonate anyone else he pleased.

Do you mean to say Ward Porton dared to come here and impersonate me and get them?

What's he going to do—forge papers, or impersonate somebody?

This bewilderment was due to Miss Lessing's inability to impersonate.

WORD ORIGIN

1620s, "to invest with a personality," from assimilated form of Latin in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + persona "person." Sense of "to assume the person or character of" is first recorded 1715. Earlier in same sense was personate (1610s). Related: Impersonated; impersonating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR IMPERSONATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.