Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MOCK

To treat a child wholly as an adult would be to mock and destroy it.

"He's a bad boy," said the Bookmaker, in a tone of mock condemnation.

Meeting Casanova in the entry, he gave him precedence with mock politeness.

Like the forfeits in a barbers shop, As much in mock as mark.

Nor were they the most horrible of those dreams in which she would help him to mock me.

They little dream how sadly they mock and betray their own faces.

At length they rose from the verdant green, and chased each other in mock pursuit.

I mock at everything in the world, especially feelings; and she is taking alarm.

It may be—it IS—devoted to purposes that mock the dead in their graves.

"She's paying for her mock composure, after all," said the matrons.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "to deceive;" mid-15c. "make fun of," from Old French mocquer "deride, jeer," of unknown origin, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *muccare "to blow the nose" (as a derisive gesture), from Latin mucus; or possibly from Middle Dutch mocken "to mumble" or Middle Low German mucken "grumble." Or perhaps simply imitative of such speech. Related: Mocked; mocking; mockingly. Replaced Old English bysmerian. Sense of "imitating," as in mockingbird and mock turtle (1763), is from notion of derisive imitation.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MOCK

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.