Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCORNING

Shakespeare is perfectly willing to depict Hotspur as scorning the arts.

Yet perhaps he is only some false flatterer who is scorning us all the time.

"No, I wasn't listening," said Cecily, scorning apology or excuse.

Unkind Hermia, to join with men in scorning your poor friend.

"Don't want any 'tato," objected Janie, scorning the proffered dish.

Adine had ceased her scorning tones; now she was asking for an answer.

This, then, is the wisdom you have gained by scorning the mysteries of the Church?

"We are in for it now," she went on, scorning the compliment.

Scorning them all, he fully intended to get the better of them yet.

It is true that he had been genuine in scorning social climbers.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, a shortening of Old French escarn "mockery, derision, contempt," a common Romanic word (cf. Spanish escarnio, Italian scherno) of Germanic origin, from Proto-Germanic *skarnjan "mock, deride" (cf. Old High German skern "mockery, jest, sport," Middle High German scherzen "to jump with joy").

Probably influenced by Old French escorne "affront, disgrace," which is a back-formation from escorner, literally "to break off (someone's) horns," from Vulgar Latin *excornare (source of Italian scornare "treat with contempt"), from Latin ex- "without" (see ex-) + cornu "horn" (see horn (n.)).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.